Home » Spiritual Formation » The Gift of Listening

The Gift of Listening

In the moments just before dawn this morning, I sat on my back porch, soaking up the sounds that God made. It was still too dark to see anything, so my sense of hearing was more finely tuned to the cardinal’s song greeting the coming light, the rasping of the crickets, the scratching of the squirrels as they ventured down the oak tree to drink from the bird bath… I could even hear the whir of hummingbird wings as the tiny bird neared the feeder beside the porch. It was a feast for my ears, and for my soul!

Listening is a gift…It is a gift that God offers–in the staggering discovery that God actually listens to us–and it is a gift that we offer others…  -Adam S. McHugh, The Listening Life

I’ve spent the last week studying and pondering the fourteenth chapter of Luke’s gospel. A leader of the Pharisees invites Jesus to join him and his guests (more Pharisees) for Sabbath dinner so that they can observe him. They’ve heard that his Sabbath behavior can be inappropriate, so they test him. Jesus, of course, sees it as the perfect opportunity to challenge their perverted understanding of humility, compassion, generosity and hospitality and to teach them God’s perspective about these virtues.

Jesus is quite clear that we are to cultivate and practice these virtues now if we want to sit at God’s dinner table when the Kingdom comes in the fullness of time. I am challenged by this. I am not by nature consistently humble, compassionate, generous, or hospitable. And from what I observe of human nature, I’m not alone.

As I listened to the sounds of creation this morning, Jesus’ words from Luke 14 echoed in my mind, as well as McHugh’s proclamation that listening is a gift. Jesus always listened. (And he still does!) He was never too rushed, too busy to stop and listen to someone’s need. And I sensed the Spirit saying that listening is critical to developing the virtues of humility, compassion, generosity, and hospitality.

Listening requires humility, first and foremost. I have to be humble enough to set aside my thoughts, my desire to speak, in order to truly listen to another. Deep listening reflects compassionate concern for others. Listening prompts generosity and is, in and of itself, an offer of hospitality.

Listening is a gift–first from God to us in that he listens to us continually, and then from us to others as we freely, humbly, compassionately, generously and hospitably give what we have been given.

In our lives, Lord, let this be so. Amen and amen.

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